Recent Changes

Monday, May 5

  1. page home edited News Flash: Parent-teacher Student-led conferences will ... held on Wednesday 4 December. …

    News Flash:
    Parent-teacherStudent-led conferences will
    ...
    held on Wednesday 4 December.Thursday 29 May. School will end at 12:1013:35 that day. Parents may attend either an early session from 13:30-15:30 or a late session from 17:30-19:30.day and conferences will begin at 14:00 and finish at 19:30. After-school activities are cancelled that day to make more time for conferences. Please have
    ...
    indicate your time preference on the Parent-TeacherStudent-Led Conference Sign Up Sheet located in the WIS hallway on the door of room 125.homeroom doors. Looking forward
    HELLO, parents and students, and welcome to our class wiki. This will be ground zero for everything that's happening in World Studies this year and I encourage you all to check it regularly. The site will be an ongoing and evolving project throughout the school year and its content will hopefully grow richer as we progress and I become more tech savvy.
    Most of our returning students I have gotten to over the past few years and I had the pleasure of meeting some of our new families during orientation. For those I haven't met, let me offer a brief intro. My name is Sean Dooley and I’m from Los Angeles. I began my teaching career as an academic tutor while I was a student at the University of California at Los Angeles . I went on to teach at both public and private schools in and around the Beverly Hills school district. I’ve been teaching at WIS since I moved here in 2009, when I also began teaching English as a second language. In addition to teaching World Studies this year, I’ll be the be the classroom advisor for Grade 8 and the Diploma Programme coordinator. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to contact me at dooley@fem.org.pl. Or you may contact the school at:
    (view changes)
    11:52 pm

Tuesday, April 29

  1. page MYP 1 and 2 edited MYP 1 COURSE DESCRIPTION {MYP 1 course description.doc} Unit title: The Industrial Revolution …
    MYP 1 COURSE DESCRIPTION {MYP 1 course description.doc}
    Unit title: The Industrial Revolution
    Statement of inquiry: New ideas and technology can transform a society.
    Key concept: change
    change allows examination of the forces that shape the world: past, present and future. The causes and effects of change can be natural and artificial; intentional and unintentional; positive, negative or neutral. We will explore the role of individuals and societies in shaping change (Individuals and societies guide, 2015).
    For this unit we will be exploring a number of inventors and business people who gave birth to the Industrial Revolution and how that revolution shaped British society.
    Related concepts: causality, innovation and revolution
    causality is the relationship between cause and effect and the internal and external factors that influence this relationship. In history, a cause is something that gives rise to an action, event, phenomenon or condition. A consequence is a result or an effect of an action, phenomenon or condition. Causes and consequences are often examined together in relation to a specific event, phenomenon or time period, particularly over the “short term”and “long term” (Individuals and societies guide, 2015).
    For this unit we will be examining the causes, processes and consequences of the Industrial Revolution in Britain.
    innovation and revolution, in history this concept looks at the process of generating new ideas, events and movements, products or solutions through the alteration, transformation, reorganization, restructuring, rearrangement, or renovation of existing ideas, events, movements, products or solutions. Innovation involves individuals and societies because they use their capacity to create, contrive and initiate a capacity that can lead to both positive and negative consequences in the short term and the long term (Individuals and societies guide, 2015).
    For this unit we will be examining the positive and negative consequences of the inventions and ideas of the Industrial Revolution.
    Global context: Scientific and technical innovation
    An inquiry into the natural world and its laws; the interaction between the natural world (physical and biological) and human societies; how humans use their understanding of scientific principles; the impact of scientific and technological advances on society and the environment (MYP: From principles into practice, 2015).
    Our inquiry will focus on the impact of scientific and technological advances on society and the environment.
    Content
    Changes in Britain from 1750-1900
    Richard Arkwright and the cotton industry
    Industrialization and urbanization
    Child labor
    Transport revolution
    Assessment objectives
    A1: use vocabulary in context
    use the following vocabulary in context:
    People:
    Places:
    Things:
    Ideas:
    A2: demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the Industrial Revolution and related concepts, using descriptions, explanations and examples
    describe
    explain
    B3: collect and record relevant information consistent with the research question
    collect and record information relevant to the research question, “How?”
    ATL: Organization skills--managing time and tasks effectively by keeping an organized and logical system of information files
    B4: reflect on the process and results of the investigation
    reflect on the process and results of an investigation into the research question,“?”
    ATL: Reflection skills—considering the process of learning by asking what questions do I have now
    Learner Profile: Reflective—We work to understand our strengths and weaknesses in order to support our learning and personal development
    C3: list sources of information in a way that follows the task instructions
    list and sources of information for the research essay according to MLA format
    ATL: Media literacy skills—locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media
    Learner Profile: Principled—We act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness and justice, and with respect for the dignity and rights of other people.
    D2: use information to give an opinion
    D3: identify and analyze a range of sources/data in terms of origin and purpose
    analyze and evaluate a range of primary and secondary sources related to the Industrial Revolution in terms of origin and purpose
    Weekly Timeline
    Weeks 1-2 (April 28): Changes is Britain from 1750-1900
    Reading: Holt World History 644-47 __Holt World History 644-47.pdf__
    Handout: __Industrial Revolution intro worksheet.docx__
    Class activity on Crazy Victorian Inventions: __http://www.activehistory.co.uk/main_area/games/ppt_online/index.php?id=yr9_crazy_inventions__
    Horation Ramsbottom simulation: __http://www.activehistory.co.uk/main_area/games/yr9_ramsbottom/frameset.htm__
    Task sheet: __Horatio Ramsbottom assignment__
    Suggested reading:
    primary source:
    secondary source:
    Week 3 (May 12): Richard Arkwright and the cotton industry
    Reading: WH
    Handout: Activehistory
    Suggested reading:
    primary source:
    secondary source:
    Week 4 (May 19): Industrialization and urbanization
    Reading: WH
    Handout: Activehistory
    Suggested reading:
    primary source:
    secondary source:
    Week 5 (May 26): Child labor
    Reading: WH
    Handout: Activehistory
    Suggested reading:
    primary source:
    secondary source:
    Weeks 6-7 (June 2): Transport revolution
    Reading: WH
    Handout: Activehistory
    Suggested reading:
    primary source:
    secondary source:

    Mapping
    How do we study and understand the world?
    (view changes)
    6:36 am
  2. page MYP 3 edited MYP 3 COURSE DESCRIPTION {MYP 3 course description.doc} Unit title: The Russian Revolution St…

    MYP 3 COURSE DESCRIPTION {MYP 3 course description.doc}
    Unit title: The Russian Revolution
    Statement of inquiry: Ideology and inequality are powerful agents of change.
    Key concept: change
    change allows examination of the forces that shape the world: past, present and future. The causes and effects of change can be natural and artificial; intentional and unintentional; positive, negative or neutral. We will explore the role of individuals and societies in shaping change (Individuals and societies guide, 2015).
    For this unit we will be exploring causes, processes and consequences of the Russian Revolution.
    Related concepts: conflict, ideology
    conflict can develop from inequalities in distribution of power and may manifest itself in many forms: protracted disagreements or arguments; prolonged armed struggles; clashes of opposing feelings or needs; serious incompatibilities between two or more opinions, principles or interests. Historians study conflict between individuals and societies over time and across place and space, and they also examine how conflicts can be sources of continuity and catalysts for change (Individuals and societies guide, 2015).
    For this unit we will be examining the inequalities in Russian society at the turn of the 20th century and how opposing interests led to revolution.
    ideology is a system of ideas and ideals, which can form the basis of political or economic theories, policies and actions. Ideologies usually encompass systematic arrangements of premises and assertions that are used to interpret the world and make normative assertions about how it should be organized. Ideologies can evolve and change over time in order to meet the needs of a group of people or a society. Ideologies can be derived from the place and space in which a group of people or a society is located. Ideologies can evolve into political, economic or social systems and these systems can impact humans in a variety of ways. For example, through the definition of certain rights and responsibilities (Individuals and societies guide, 2015).
    For this unit we will be examining the political theory of Marxism and how it was used to overthrow the Provisional Government and organize Russian society.
    Global context: fairness and development
    An inquiry into rights and responsibilities in the struggle to share finite resources with other people and with other living things; communities and the relationships within and between them; access to equal opportunities; peace and conflict resolution (MYP: From principles into practice, 2015).
    Our inquiry will focus on the struggle to share the finite resources of Russia at the turn of the 20th century and the degree to which the Bolsheviks were successful at creating a classless society where everyone is equal.
    Content
    The Provisional Government and the Soviets, the growing power of revolutionary groups
    Reasons for the failure of the Provisional Government
    The Bolshevik seizure of power, the role of Lenin
    The main features of Bolshevik rule, the Civil War and War Communism, and reasons for the Bolshevik victory
    The Kronstadt Rising and the establishment of the New Economic Policy
    Assessment objectives
    A1: use a range of terminology in context
    use the following terms in context:
    People:
    Places:
    Things:
    Ideas:
    A2: demonstrate knowledge and understanding through descriptions, explanations and examples
    explain why the Bolshevik’s were able to seize power in November 1917
    explain how the Bolsheviks won the Civil War
    B3: use methods to collect and record relevant information
    use research methods to collect and record information related to the research question, “How did the Bolsheviks gain and hold on to power?”
    ATL: Organization skills--managing time and tasks effectively by keeping an organized and logical system of information files
    B4: evaluate the process and results of an investigation, with guidance
    evaluate the process and results of an investigation into the research question,“How did the Bolsheviks gain and hold on to power?”
    ATL: Reflection skills—considering the process of learning by asking what questions do I have now
    Learner Profile: Reflective—We work to understand our strengths and weaknesses in order to support our learning and personal development
    C3: create a reference list and cite sources of information
    create a reference list and cite sources of information for the research essay
    ATL: Media literacy skills—locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media
    Learner Profile: Principled—We act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness and justice, and with respect for the dignity and rights of other people.
    D2: summarize information to make valid, well-supported arguments
    argue how effectively the Provisional Government ruled Russia in 1917
    argue how successful the New Economic Policy was
    D3: analyze and evaluate a wide range of sources/data in terms of origin and purpose, examining values and limitations
    analyze and evaluate a range of primary and secondary sources related to the Russian Revolution in terms of origin and purpose, examining values and limitations
    Weekly Timeline
    Weeks 1-2 (April 28): How effective was the Provisional Government?
    Reading: MWH 111-13
    Homework: MWH p. 113 Focus Task
    Classroom activity: “The October Revolution: Popular Uprising or coup d’etat?” __http://www.activehistory.co.uk/main_area/games/ppt_online/index.php?id=ib_octrev__
    Handout: “How popular was the PG/How popular were the Bolsheviks?” __Activity-timeline of the PG .docx__
    Suggested reading:
    historical news story
    modern news story
    Week 3 (May 12): Why were the Bolsheviks successful?
    Reading: MWH 114-16
    Apr 29 Homework: MWH p. 116 Focus Task
    Handout: Activehistory
    Suggested reading:
    historical news story
    modern news story
    Week 4 (May 19): Why did the Bolsheviks win the Civil War?
    Reading: MWH 117-22
    Homework: MWH p. 117 Focus Task
    Handout: Activehistory
    Suggested reading:
    historical news story
    modern news story
    Week 5 (May 26): How did the Bolsheviks keep power?
    Reading: MWH 123-25
    Homework: MWH p. 125 Focus Task
    Handout: Activehistory
    Suggested reading:
    historical news story
    modern news story
    Weeks 6-7 (June 2): The Kronstadt Rising and the establishment of the New Economic Policy
    Reading: MWH 123-25
    Homework: MWH p. 122-23 Q1-4 (margins)
    Handout: Activehistory
    Suggested reading:
    historical news story
    modern news story
    Week 8 (June 16): Death of Lenin and the creation of the USSR
    Reading: MWH
    Handout: Activehistory
    Suggested reading:
    historical news story
    modern news story

    THE FIRST WORLD WAR
    Was world war inevitable in 1914?
    (view changes)
    6:35 am

Sunday, April 27

  1. page MYP 4 and 5 edited MYP 4/5 Course Description {MYP 4-5 course description.doc} Unit title: The Origins of the Cold …
    MYP 4/5 Course Description {MYP 4-5 course description.doc}
    Unit title: The Origins of the Cold War
    Statement of inquiry: Nations form alliances to protect their military, cultural and economic interests.
    Key concept: systems
    systems are sets of interacting or independent components. Systems provide structure and order in human and natural and built environments. Systems can be static or dynamic, simple or complex. For individuals and societies, systems thinking provides a powerful tool for understanding both natural and human environments, and the role of individuals within them. Social and natural systems rely on a state of equilibrium and are vulnerable to change from internal and external forces (Individuals and societies guide, 2015).
    For this unit we will be focusing on the ideological systems of capitalism and communism and on the alliance systems of Nato and the Warsaw Pact.

    Related concepts: conflict, cooperation, ideology
    conflict can develop from inequalities in distribution of power and may manifest itself in many forms: protracted disagreements or arguments; prolonged armed struggles; clashes of opposing feelings or needs; serious incompatibilities between two or more opinions, principles or interests. Historians study conflict between individuals and societies over time and across place and space, and they also examine how conflicts can be sources of continuity and catalysts for change (Individuals and societies guide, 2015).
    For this unit we will be examining the opposing feelings and needs of the USSR and the USA and how that opposition led to long-term conflict.
    cooperation is the action or process of individuals or societies working together towards the same end. Historians examine the cooperation between societies, individuals, and environments in order to determine the positive, negative, short-term and long-term factors that define/derive a historical event or process. Cooperation can be a catalyst for change or continuity. Cooperation between actors implies certain levels of responsibility (Individuals and societies guide, 2015).
    For this unit we will be examining the cooperation agreements that developed between countries and how they helped define the future course of the Cold War.
    ideology is a system of ideas and ideals, which can form the basis of political or economic theories, policies and actions. Ideologies usually encompass systematic arrangements of premises and assertions that are used to interpret the world and make normative assertions about how it should be organized. Ideologies can evolve and change over time in order to meet the needs of a group of people or a society. Ideologies can be derived from the place and space in which a group of people or a society is located. Ideologies can evolve into political, economic or social systems and these systems can impact humans in a variety of ways. For example, through the definition of certain rights and responsibilities (Individuals and societies guide, 2015).
    For this unit we will be examining the political ideologies of the USA and USSR and how those ideologies led those countries to make decisions about how the world should be organized.

    Global context: identities and relationships
    StatementAn inquiry into the nature of inquiry: Nations form alliancesthe self; beliefs and values; personal, physical, mental, social and spiritual health; human relationships including families, friends, communities, and cultures; rights and responsibilities; what it means to protect their military, culturalbe human.
    Our inquiry will focus on the beliefs and values of communists and capitalists, Americans and Soviets,
    and economic interests.the clash between these two cultures.
    Assessment objectives:objectives
    A1: use a wide range of terminology in context
    ...
    in context: Yalta Conference, Churchill,
    People:
    Roosevelt, Churchill, Stalin, Truman, Atlee, theMolotov, Kennan, Wallace, Byrnes, Lublin Poles, London Poles
    Places:Berlin, West Germany, East Germany, Poland, Greece, Czechoslovakia, Romania, Bulgaria, Hungary, Albania, Italy, France
    Things:the
    United Nations, Yalta Conference, Potsdam Conference, reparations, iron curtain, sphere of influence, Marshall Aid, Truman Doctrine, Nato, the Warsaw Pact, the Long Telegram, Cominform, Comecon, Marshall Plan, provisional/interim government, coalition government, occupation zones, sectors, Berlin Blockade, the policyBerlin airlift, propaganda, denazification, cold war
    Ideas:iron curtain, sphere
    of containment,communism,influence, containment, communism, capitalism, democracy, Kennan, Wallacebuffer zone, freedom of the press, freedom of assembly, freedom of speech, superpower, Truman Doctrine
    A2: demonstrate knowledge and understanding through developed descriptions, explanations and examples
    explain why the USA-USSR alliance in 1945-46 began to break down in 1945
    ...
    Weekly Timeline (31 March-23 May)
    Week 1 (31 March): The Yalta Conference
    o Reading:Reading: MWH 318-21
    o Handout:

    Handout:
    Sources of
    ...
    Europe (Yalta)
    Suggested reading:

    Week 2 (7 April): The Potsdam Conference
    o Reading:Reading: MWH 322-323
    o Handout:

    Handout:
    Sources of
    ...
    Europe (Potsdam)
    Handout: Sources of Discord Activity 2: The breakdown of cooperation (First and Interim Meetings of Council of Foreign Ministers)
    Handout: Sources of Discord Activity 2: The breakdown of cooperation (Second Meeting of Council of Foreign Ministers)
    Suggested reading:

    Week 3 (14 April): Soviet expansionism
    o Reading:Reading: MWH 324-327
    o Handout: Sources

    Handout: “Salami Tactics,” Stalin’s takeover
    of Discord ActivityEastern Europe: __http://www.activehistory.co.uk/main_area/worksheets/gcse/cold_war/10_Salami%20Tactics.pdf__
    Resources:
    Churchhill’s “Iron Curtain” speech: __http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S2PUIQpAEAQ__
    CNN-BBC Cold War series, episode
    2: The breakdown of cooperation (First and Interim Meetings of Council of Foreign Ministers)
    o Handout: Sources of Discord Activity 2: The breakdown of cooperation (Second Meeting of Council of Foreign Ministers)
    Iron Curtain 1945-1947 __http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J9UkOyBiRf4__
    Revision: __http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/history/mwh/ir2/sovietexpansionineasterneuroperev1.shtml__
    Suggested reading:
    “Poland: NATO should send troops to east Europe, ignore Russia's objections” __http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/04/15/us-ukraine-crisis-poland-idUSBREA3E0QS20140415__
    “Special Report: How the US made its Putin problem worse” __http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/04/18/us-ukraine-putin-diplomacy-special-repor-idUSBREA3H0OQ20140418__

    Week 4 (28 April): The American reaction
    o Reading:Reading: MWH 328-330
    o Handout:

    Handout:
    Sources of
    ...
    down (Kennan)
    o Handout:

    Handout:
    Sources of
    ...
    down (Wallace)
    Suggested reading:
    Telegram from Nikolai Novikov, Soviet Ambassador to the US, to the Soviet Leadership," September 27, 1946. Novikov describes the advent of a more assertive US foreign policy. He cautions the Soviet leadership that the Truman administration is bent on imposing US political, military and economic domination around the world. This telegram has, since its discovery in the Russian archives, been labelled the Soviet equivalent of US Ambassador to the Soviet Union George Kennan's "Long telegram: __http://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/110808__
    “In Cold War Echo, Obama Strategy Writes Off Putin” __http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/20/world/europe/in-cold-war-echo-obama-strategy-writes-off-putin.html?hp&_r=0__
    “Russia needs to defend its interest with an iron fist” __http://eng.globalaffairs.ru/pubcol/Russia-needs-to-defend-its-interests-with-an-iron-fist-16457__

    Week 5 (5 May): The Berlin Blockade
    o Reading:Reading: MWH 331-332
    o Wed

    Wed
    7 May:
    ...
    B, C)
    o Fri

    Task outline:
    Rubrics: __MYP 4-5 Presentation task rubrics.pdf__
    Fri
    9 May:
    ...
    the PRL”
    Suggested reading:

    Week 6 (12 May): Nato
    o Reading:Reading: MWH 333
    o Fri

    Fri
    16 May:
    ...
    (A, D)
    Task outline:
    Rubrics: __MYP 4-5 Test task rubrics.pdf__
    Suggested reading:

    Week 7 (19 May): A divided Germany
    o Reading:Reading: MWH 334-335
    o Fri

    Fri
    24 May:
    ...
    C, D)
    RESOURCES
    Digital
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/history/mwh/ir2/

    Task outline:
    Rubrics: __MYP 4-5 Essay task rubrics.pdf__
    Suggested reading:

    STUDENT WORK
    REFLECTIONS
    (view changes)
    8:19 am

Monday, April 14

  1. page MYP 4 and 5 edited MYP MYP 4/5 Course ... course description.doc} Unit title: The Origins of the Cold War…

    MYP
    MYP 4/5 Course
    ...
    course description.doc}
    Unit title: The Origins of the Cold War
    Key concept: systems
    Related concepts: conflict, cooperation, ideology
    Global context: identities and relationships
    Statement of inquiry: Nations form alliances to protect their military, cultural and economic interests.
    Assessment objectives:
    A1: use a wide range of terminology in context
    use the following terms in context: Yalta Conference, Churchill, Roosevelt, Stalin, Truman, Atlee, the United Nations, Potsdam Conference, reparations, iron curtain, sphere of influence, Marshall Aid, Truman Doctrine, Nato, the Warsaw Pact, Berlin Blockade, the policy of containment,communism, capitalism, democracy, Kennan, Wallace
    A2: demonstrate knowledge and understanding through developed descriptions, explanations and examples
    explain why the USA-USSR alliance in 1945-46 began to break down in 1945
    describe the consequences of the Berlin blockade
    explain how the USSR gained control of Europe by 1948
    B3: use research methods to collect and record appropriate, varied and relevant information
    use research methods to collect and record information related to the research question, “Who was more to blame for the start of the Cold War: the USA or the USSR?”
    ATL: Organization skills--managing time and tasks effectively by keeping an organized and logical system of information files
    B4: evaluate the process and results of an investigation
    evaluate the process and results of an investigation into the research question,“Who was more to blame for the start of the Cold War: the USA or the USSR?”
    ATL: Reflection skills—considering the process of learning by asking what questions do I have now
    Learner Profile: Reflective—We work to understand our strengths and weaknesses in order to support our learning and personal development
    C3: document sources of information using MLA format
    document sources of information for the research essay
    ATL: Media literacy skills—locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media
    Learner Profile: Principled—We act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness and justice, and with respect for the dignity and rights of other people.
    D1: discuss concepts, issues, models, visual representation, theories
    discuss Soviet expansionism and American reactions to it
    D2: synthesize information to make valid, well-supported arguments
    argue who was more to blame for starting the Cold War: the USA or the USSR
    D3: analyze and evaluate a wide range of sources/data in terms of origin and purpose, examining values and limitations
    analyze and evaluate a range of primary and secondary sources related to the Cold War in terms of origin and purpose, examining values and limitations
    D4: interpret different perspectives and their implications
    compare and contrast the arguments of George Kennan and Henry Wallace regarding U.S. policy toward the Soviet Union
    Weekly Timeline (31 March-23 May)
    Week 1 (31 March): The Yalta Conference
    o Reading: MWH 318-21
    o Handout: Sources of Discord Activity 1: Plans for postwar Europe (Yalta)
    Week 2 (7 April): The Potsdam Conference
    o Reading: MWH 322-323
    o Handout: Sources of Discord Activity 1: Plans for postwar Europe (Potsdam)
    Week 3 (14 April): Soviet expansionism
    o Reading: MWH 324-327
    o Handout: Sources of Discord Activity 2: The breakdown of cooperation (First and Interim Meetings of Council of Foreign Ministers)
    o Handout: Sources of Discord Activity 2: The breakdown of cooperation (Second Meeting of Council of Foreign Ministers)
    Week 4 (28 April): The American reaction
    o Reading: MWH 328-330
    o Handout: Sources of Discord Activity 2: Why did cooperation break down (Kennan)
    o Handout: Sources of Discord Activity 2: Why did cooperation break down (Wallace)
    Week 5 (5 May): The Berlin Blockade
    o Reading: MWH 331-332
    o Wed 7 May: Summative assessment 1--Presentation (A, B, C)
    o Fri 9 May: Speaker-Ms. Dagmara, “Life in the PRL”
    Week 6 (12 May): Nato
    o Reading: MWH 333
    o Fri 16 May: Summative assessment 2: Test (A, D)
    Week 7 (19 May): A divided Germany
    o Reading: MWH 334-335
    o Fri 24 May: Summative assessment 3: Research essay (B, C, D)
    RESOURCES
    Digital
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/history/mwh/ir2/
    STUDENT WORK
    REFLECTIONS

    NAZI GERMANY
    THE SECOND WORLD WAR
    (view changes)
    6:13 am

Monday, January 13

  1. page MYP 4 and 5 edited MYP MYP 4/5 Course ... course description.doc} NAZI GERMANY THE SECOND WORLD WAR Ar…
    MYP
    MYP
    4/5 Course
    ...
    course description.doc}
    NAZI GERMANY

    THE SECOND WORLD WAR
    Are the causes of war by accident or by design?
    (view changes)
    3:18 am

Tuesday, November 19

  1. page space.menu edited ... 2012-2013 WS Class Pages Online Library Catalog Activehistory website Proquest Historical…
    ...
    2012-2013 WS Class Pages
    Online Library Catalog
    Activehistory website
    Proquest Historical Newspapers
    Harvard Citation Generator
    (view changes)
    11:47 pm
  2. page home edited News Flash: Parent-teacher conferences will be held on Wednesday 4 December. School will end at…

    News Flash:
    Parent-teacher conferences will be held on Wednesday 4 December. School will end at 12:10 that day. Parents may attend either an early session from 13:30-15:30 or a late session from 17:30-19:30. Please have your child indicate your preference on the Parent-Teacher Sign Up Sheet located in the WIS hallway on the door of room 125. Looking forward to seeing you there!
    HELLO, parents and students, and welcome to our class wiki. This will be ground zero for everything that's happening in World Studies this year and I encourage you all to check it regularly. The site will be an ongoing and evolving project throughout the school year and its content will hopefully grow richer as we progress and I become more tech savvy.
    Most of our returning students I have gotten to over the past few years and I had the pleasure of meeting some of our new families during orientation. For those I haven't met, let me offer a brief intro. My name is Sean Dooley and I’m from Los Angeles. I began my teaching career as an academic tutor while I was a student at the University of California at Los Angeles . I went on to teach at both public and private schools in and around the Beverly Hills school district. I’ve been teaching at WIS since I moved here in 2009, when I also began teaching English as a second language. In addition to teaching World Studies this year, I’ll be the be the classroom advisor for Grade 8 and the Diploma Programme coordinator. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to contact me at dooley@fem.org.pl. Or you may contact the school at:
    (view changes)
    3:34 am

Monday, November 4

  1. page space.menu edited ... Proquest Historical Newspapers Harvard Citation Generator Cultural Exchange 2013 Cultural…
    ...
    Proquest Historical Newspapers
    Harvard Citation Generator
    Cultural Exchange 2013
    Cultural Exchange 2012
    Online Resources
    (view changes)
    2:27 am

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