MYP 3 COURSE DESCRIPTION





Unit title: The Russian Revolution
Statement of inquiry: Ideology and inequality are powerful agents of change.
Key concept: change


  • change allows examination of the forces that shape the world: past, present and future. The causes and effects of change can be natural and artificial; intentional and unintentional; positive, negative or neutral. We will explore the role of individuals and societies in shaping change (Individuals and societies guide, 2015).
    • For this unit we will be exploring causes, processes and consequences of the Russian Revolution.


Related concepts: conflict, ideology


  • conflict can develop from inequalities in distribution of power and may manifest itself in many forms: protracted disagreements or arguments; prolonged armed struggles; clashes of opposing feelings or needs; serious incompatibilities between two or more opinions, principles or interests. Historians study conflict between individuals and societies over time and across place and space, and they also examine how conflicts can be sources of continuity and catalysts for change (Individuals and societies guide, 2015).
    • For this unit we will be examining the inequalities in Russian society at the turn of the 20th century and how opposing interests led to revolution.


  • ideology is a system of ideas and ideals, which can form the basis of political or economic theories, policies and actions. Ideologies usually encompass systematic arrangements of premises and assertions that are used to interpret the world and make normative assertions about how it should be organized. Ideologies can evolve and change over time in order to meet the needs of a group of people or a society. Ideologies can be derived from the place and space in which a group of people or a society is located. Ideologies can evolve into political, economic or social systems and these systems can impact humans in a variety of ways. For example, through the definition of certain rights and responsibilities (Individuals and societies guide, 2015).
    • For this unit we will be examining the political theory of Marxism and how it was used to overthrow the Provisional Government and organize Russian society.


Global context: fairness and development
  • An inquiry into rights and responsibilities in the struggle to share finite resources with other people and with other living things; communities and the relationships within and between them; access to equal opportunities; peace and conflict resolution (MYP: From principles into practice, 2015).
    • Our inquiry will focus on the struggle to share the finite resources of Russia at the turn of the 20th century and the degree to which the Bolsheviks were successful at creating a classless society where everyone is equal.




Content
  • The Provisional Government and the Soviets, the growing power of revolutionary groups
  • Reasons for the failure of the Provisional Government
  • The Bolshevik seizure of power, the role of Lenin
  • The main features of Bolshevik rule, the Civil War and War Communism, and reasons for the Bolshevik victory
  • The Kronstadt Rising and the establishment of the New Economic Policy


Assessment objectives


A1: use a range of terminology in context
  • use the following terms in context:
    1. People:
    2. Places:
    3. Things:
    4. Ideas:
A2: demonstrate knowledge and understanding through descriptions, explanations and examples
  • explain why the Bolshevik’s were able to seize power in November 1917
  • explain how the Bolsheviks won the Civil War
B3: use methods to collect and record relevant information
  • use research methods to collect and record information related to the research question, “How did the Bolsheviks gain and hold on to power?”
  • ATL: Organization skills--managing time and tasks effectively by keeping an organized and logical system of information files
B4: evaluate the process and results of an investigation, with guidance
  • evaluate the process and results of an investigation into the research question,“How did the Bolsheviks gain and hold on to power?”
  • ATL: Reflection skills—considering the process of learning by asking what questions do I have now
  • Learner Profile: Reflective—We work to understand our strengths and weaknesses in order to support our learning and personal development
C3: create a reference list and cite sources of information
  • create a reference list and cite sources of information for the research essay
  • ATL: Media literacy skills—locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media
  • Learner Profile: Principled—We act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness and justice, and with respect for the dignity and rights of other people.
D2: summarize information to make valid, well-supported arguments
  • argue how effectively the Provisional Government ruled Russia in 1917
  • argue how successful the New Economic Policy was
D3: analyze and evaluate a wide range of sources/data in terms of origin and purpose, examining values and limitations
  • analyze and evaluate a range of primary and secondary sources related to the Russian Revolution in terms of origin and purpose, examining values and limitations




Weekly Timeline
  • Weeks 1-2 (April 28): How effective was the Provisional Government?
  • Week 3 (May 12): Why were the Bolsheviks successful?
    • Reading: MWH 114-16
      • Apr 29 Homework: MWH p. 116 Focus Task
    • Handout: Activehistory
    • Suggested reading:
      • historical news story
      • modern news story
  • Week 4 (May 19): Why did the Bolsheviks win the Civil War?
    • Reading: MWH 117-22
      • Homework: MWH p. 117 Focus Task
    • Handout: Activehistory
    • Suggested reading:
      • historical news story
      • modern news story
  • Week 5 (May 26): How did the Bolsheviks keep power?
    • Reading: MWH 123-25
      • Homework: MWH p. 125 Focus Task
    • Handout: Activehistory
    • Suggested reading:
      • historical news story
      • modern news story
  • Weeks 6-7 (June 2): The Kronstadt Rising and the establishment of the New Economic Policy
    • Reading: MWH 123-25
      • Homework: MWH p. 122-23 Q1-4 (margins)
    • Handout: Activehistory
    • Suggested reading:
      • historical news story
      • modern news story
  • Week 8 (June 16): Death of Lenin and the creation of the USSR
    • Reading: MWH
    • Handout: Activehistory
    • Suggested reading:
      • historical news story
      • modern news story






THE FIRST WORLD WAR

Was world war inevitable in 1914?
Key Concept: Global InteractionsObjectives: A1, A2; C2, C3; D2, D3ATL: Information LiteracyLearner Profile: Inquirers

LOGBOOK

  • Week One: Causes of the First Wold War
  • Week Two: Schleiffen Plan, Plan 17; Mood in Europe on the eve of war; stalemate

ASSESSMENTS

RESOURCES

  • Required reading
  • Suggested reading

STUDENT WORK

  • To make them familiar with Criterion A, students were asked to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of a topic they know well by using developed descriptions, explanations and examples. Here Chiharu tells us about Japanese, and Kristian tells us about Major League Gaming.

REFLECTIONS